fbpx

Conservation

Rhino Conservation Program

OPPORTUNITY TO EXPERIENCE FIRST HAND RHINO CONSERVATION

Experience the rare opportunity to participate in a rhino conservation experience. Witness the darting and immobilization of a white or black rhino and assist the veterinary team in monitoring the animal during the capture by taking temperature, measuring the breathing rate, etc.

Lapalala Wilderness Nature Reserve is committed to ensuring the survival of Africa’s rhinos and implements best practice research and management is to obtain rhino DNA samples, to ear notch and to place micro- chips for identification, research and security purposes. The DNA kit collection forms part of the Rhino DNA  Indexing System (RhODIS), which is a forensic tool that stores a unique genetic fingerprint for every rhino that has been sampled. Samples collected include blood, tissue and horn. Ear notching is a method Lapalala Wilderness Reserve uses to identify individual rhinos on the reserve. This enables our rhino trackers and researchers to monitor the rhino’s movements, interactions, health and safety.

Elephant Conservation Program

CONSERVATION OPPORTUNITY TO ASSIST LAPALALA NATURE RESERVE WITH ELEPHANT CONSERVATION EFFORTS

Be a part of Lapalala Wilderness’ incredible conservation story, by embarking on Elephant Conservation activities at Tintswalo Lapalala. Depending on which research activity is available at the time, you will have the opportunity to participate in an elephant collaring. Be captivated by these once-in-a-lifetime adventures, as you get up-close-and-personal with these iconic wildlife giants.

Historically, African elephant occurred naturally in the Waterberg. At Lapalala Wilderness it is our aim to re-establish the full complement of large mammals that used to occur in the Waterberg area and for this reason we reintroduced our first herd of elephant onto the reserve in 2017. A second herd of elephant as well as a number of mature bulls arrived between 2018 and 2019. Lapalala Wilderness’s entire elephant population now consists of 27 individuals. Numerous research projects have been launched that will be focusing on the sustainable management of our elephant population, including a contraception project and an elephant impact study, which includes the establishment of elephant ex-closure plots to assess the impact our elephant have on Lapalala Wilderness’s landscape in the long term.